YARROW


STEMMING BLEEDING


It has a well – established use as an antiseptic and analgesic and was famously used on Roman battlefields. The juice or dried herb powder can be applied to bleeding wounds. 


BLOOD MOVER


Yarrow is used internally to shift stagnant blood and to treat internal bleeding. It is often the herb of choice for relieving stagnant blood conditions such as varicose veins, fibroids, blood blisters. 

DIGESTIVE TONIC


Yarrow is a bitter herb and helps with digestion. It is a tonic to the gallbladder and to the liver and is a useful ally for indigestion, heartburn and a poor appetite.



A ROMAN BATTLEFIELD HERB 


Yarrow is an ancient herb that been used as medicine by humans for tens of thousands of years and has been linked to use by the Neanderthals as far back as 50,000 years ago. 


It is said to get its Latin name, Achillea millefolium, from Achilles, who had allegedly become a great healer and who used yarrow to stem the bleeding of his fellow soldiers in battle. Its other nicknames include names like woundwort, nosebleed, old man’s pepper, staunchweed, sanguinary, spearwort and knight’s milfoil and it has a well – established use as an antiseptic and analgesic and was famously used on Roman battlefields. The juice or dried herb powder can be applied to bleeding wounds. 


Although yarrow is renowned for stopping external bleeding, it is used internally to shift stagnant blood and to treat internal bleeding. It is often the herb of choice for relieving stagnant blood conditions such as varicose veins, fibroids, blood blisters. Yarrow’s ability to harmonise the blood makes it useful for wide range of issues conditions including leucorrhoea and urinary haemorrhage. 


Yarrow is anti – inflammatory too and broadly antimicrobial and contains salicylic acid derivatives so it is helpful for reducing pain and for fever. It is relaxing to the voluntary nervous system and so can help with a range of cramping and spasms, with an affinity for the uterus as it has a reputation for normalising menses, relieving painful periods and cramps and reducing excessive bleeding. 


 As it is a bitter herb, yarrow helps with digestion and is a tonic to the gallbladder and to the liver and is a useful ally for indigestion, heartburn and a poor appetite.


Yarrow has long been used as a remedy for colds and flu. The hot tea is a diaphoretic, bringing on a sweat that breaks a fever whilst flushing toxins from the system. 


REFERENCES 


Hoffmann, D., 2003. Medical Herbalism. Rochester, Vt.: Healing Arts Press. 


Sams, T., 2015. Healing Herbs. Fair Winds Press. 


Yance, D., n.d. Adaptogens In Medical Herbalism.

 

Hello You!

Join our mailing list