CHINESE SKULLCAP


ANTI VIRAL


Chinese Skullcap is a broad – spectrum antiviral with a wide range of activity against viruses including Hepatitis A,B,C and influenza B, SARS coronavirus, polio, parainfluenza, mosaic, adenovirus, avian infectious bronchitis and Epstein – Barr. 


ANTI - BACTERIAL


Chinese Skullcap has a wide range of action against some bacteria including staph organisms, Candida albicans, Helicobacter pylori and ureaplasma through the stimulation of the body’s immune response. 

NERVE PROTECTOR


Chinese Skullcap is used to treat infections that attack the central nervous system such as mycoplasma, Lyme and viral and bacterial central nervous system infections.



AN ALL - ROUND ANTI VIRAL


Chinese skullcap is native to China and parts of Russia and is known as Baical skullcap and huang qin. It is considered specific in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for clearing ‘damp heat’ and is a very well – known anti – inflammatory agent and one of the fifty fundamental herbs essential to TCM. 


It is also a broad – spectrum antiviral with a wide range of activity against viruses including Hepatitis A,B,C and influenza B, SARS coronavirus, polio, parainfluenza, mosaic, adenovirus, avian infectious bronchitis and Epstein – Barr. It is used to treat viral infections, particularly pandemic influenza and respiratory infections as well as infections that attack the central nervous system such as mycoplasma, Lyme.


It also has a wide range of action against some bacteria including staph organisms and some other microbes through the stimulation of the body’s immune response and preliminary evidence suggests that one of its compounds can enhance antibiotic activity against staph bacteria.


It is also used in the treatment of dysentery, hepatitis, nephritis, urinary tract infections, immune deficiency syndrome and sleep disruptions.


Chinese skullcap is a synergist and strongly inhibits a type of enzyme in the liver (CYP3A4) so if it is taken along with pharmaceuticals, often less of it will be metabolised but, in some cases, the impacts of the drug can be stronger and it can increase pharmaceutical drugs’ impact in the system. 


REFERENCES 


Bone, K. and Mills, S., 2013. Principles And Practice Of Phytotherapy. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone 


Winston, D. and Maimes, S., 2019. Adaptogens. 


Yance, D., 2013. Adaptogens In Medical Herbalism.  

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